Discussion:
News extracts: Nov. 28, 1828: Failure of a banking house in London, Messrs. Fry and Chapman
(too old to reply)
Alison Kilpatrick
2010-11-28 12:23:56 UTC
Permalink
Transcribed from the 28 November 1828 edition of The Newry Commercial
Telegraph newspaper, by permission of The British Library:

Failure in London.--At the usual hour of commencing business in the
City on Monday morning, the commercial and banking part of the community
were thrown into the utmost consternation by the announcement of the
stoppage of a banking-house of considerable standing; that of Messrs.
Fry and Chapman, of St. Mildred's-court. These gentlemen have accounts
with twenty-five country firms, and it is apprehended that the evil
occasioned by this calamity may not be confined to the house in
question, but possibly will be injurious to the firms with which they
are in connection.

==================
Peter Goodey
2010-11-28 17:01:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alison Kilpatrick
the commercial and banking part of the community
were thrown into the utmost consternation by the announcement of the
stoppage of a banking-house of considerable standing; that of Messrs.
Fry and Chapman, of St. Mildred's-court.
Well done, Alison. You have a knack for spotting them!
MB
2010-11-29 12:11:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alison Kilpatrick
the commercial and banking part of the community
were thrown into the utmost consternation by the announcement of the
stoppage of a banking-house of considerable standing; that of Messrs.
Fry and Chapman, of St. Mildred's-court.
Well done, Alison. You have a knack for spotting them!


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My favourite find when I looking up local stories was one in the late 19th
Century where two men were working on a kitchen in Onich. They put a piece
of gelignite in a kettle (as you do!) and needless to say they were both
killed.

I presume they were trying to soften it?
Lesley Robertson
2010-11-29 17:03:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alison Kilpatrick
the commercial and banking part of the community
were thrown into the utmost consternation by the announcement of the
stoppage of a banking-house of considerable standing; that of
Messrs.
Fry and Chapman, of St. Mildred's-court.
Well done, Alison. You have a knack for spotting them!


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



My favourite find when I looking up local stories was one in the late
19th
Century where two men were working on a kitchen in Onich. They put a
piece
of gelignite in a kettle (as you do!) and needless to say they were
both
killed.

I presume they were trying to soften it?

***************

Obvious candidates for a Darwin Award!

Lesley Robertson

CWatters
2010-11-28 17:05:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alison Kilpatrick
Transcribed from the 28 November 1828 edition of The Newry Commercial
Failure in London.--At the usual hour of commencing business in the
City on Monday morning, the commercial and banking part of the community
were thrown into the utmost consternation by the announcement of the
stoppage of a banking-house of considerable standing; that of Messrs.
Fry and Chapman, of St. Mildred's-court. These gentlemen have accounts
with twenty-five country firms, and it is apprehended that the evil
occasioned by this calamity may not be confined to the house in
question, but possibly will be injurious to the firms with which they
are in connection.
==================
Appears the bank was owned by a Joseph Fry. Wife Elizabeth was a famous
Quaker...

http://www.heritagecity.org/research-centre/whos-who/elizabeth-fry.htm

"In 1828 Joseph Fry's Bank failed precipitating her husband's disownment by
the Society on the presumption that he had put other people's money at
risk. Elizabeth herself was wrongfully accused of using the bank's funds
for her charitable work."

More on that link.
Roy Stockdill
2010-11-28 20:11:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by CWatters
Post by Alison Kilpatrick
Transcribed from the 28 November 1828 edition of The Newry
Commercial Telegraph newspaper, by permission of The British
Failure in London.--At the usual hour of commencing business in
the
City on Monday morning, the commercial and banking part of the
community were thrown into the utmost consternation by the
announcement of the stoppage of a banking-house of considerable
standing; that of Messrs. Fry and Chapman, of St. Mildred's-court.
These gentlemen have accounts with twenty-five country firms, and it
is apprehended that the evil occasioned by this calamity may not be
confined to the house in question, but possibly will be injurious to
the firms with which they are in connection.
==================
Appears the bank was owned by a Joseph Fry. Wife Elizabeth was a
famous Quaker...>
And of course she appears on the five-pound note ! How ironic !!!

--
Roy Stockdill
Genealogical researcher, writer & lecturer
Newbies' Guide to Genealogy & Family History: www.genuki.org.uk/gs/Newbie.html

"There is only one thing in the world worse than being talked about,
and that is not being talked about."
OSCAR WILDE
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